Hats From History

Hats from History

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Anonymous asked: Hello, I am a painter and was hoping to do a piece about The Highwayman a poem by Alfred Noyes. I was wondering if you would have any input in the type of hat he describes him wearing, he writes "He'd a French cocked-hat on his forehead" I know it's not much to go on but if you have any suggestions as to what it would look like, I'd greatly appreciate it! Thanks!

Sure thing!  A “cocked hat” is the actual term for what we- today- call a tricorne.  Here are a few examples I’ve posted:

http://hatsfromhistory.tumblr.com/tagged/cocked-hat

And here’s a picture of my berfran wearing his cocked at “on his forehead” or at a rakish, daring angle:

This picture taking by the amazingly talented Drifting Focus

More power to the cocked hat!  Highwaymen are the jam!

4 notes

Lucy of Leinster by William Ward, 1788, via Donald Heald. 
I love Lucy!
From Donald Heald: 
“A sweet portrait of Thomas Tickell’s heroine “Lucy of Leinster,” engraved by the celebrated engraver William Ward.
William Ward is remembered as one of the most accomplished engravers of his day. He produced some of the most beautiful prints of the period, and his delicate engravings epitomize the style and sentiment of the age. Ward was primarily a mezzotint engraver but he also worked in stipple, executing hauntingly delicate prints that capture the soul and character of their subject. He studied under John Raphael Smith and quickly became one of his most distinguished pupils, incorporating his master’s delicate technique into his own distinctive style. Along with his brother James, William was a regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy and soon earned the privilege of becoming mezzotint engraver to the prince regent. This delicate image recalls the style of Ward’s master John Raphael Smith, who made a name for himself with his subtly suggestive portraits of women. Ward’s pretty portrait depicts the tragic heroine “Lucy of Leinster” from Thomas Tickell’s ballad “Lucy and Colin.” In Tickell’s sad work, Colin abandoned Lucy for a wealthier bride. Lucy died on her lover’s wedding day and, pursuant to her request, was brought to the church. Upon seeing his true love’s body, Colin succumbed to death as well, and the lovers were buried in the same tomb.”

Lucy of Leinster by William Ward, 1788, via Donald Heald. 

I love Lucy!

From Donald Heald: 

A sweet portrait of Thomas Tickell’s heroine “Lucy of Leinster,” engraved by the celebrated engraver William Ward.

William Ward is remembered as one of the most accomplished engravers of his day. He produced some of the most beautiful prints of the period, and his delicate engravings epitomize the style and sentiment of the age. Ward was primarily a mezzotint engraver but he also worked in stipple, executing hauntingly delicate prints that capture the soul and character of their subject. He studied under John Raphael Smith and quickly became one of his most distinguished pupils, incorporating his master’s delicate technique into his own distinctive style. Along with his brother James, William was a regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy and soon earned the privilege of becoming mezzotint engraver to the prince regent. This delicate image recalls the style of Ward’s master John Raphael Smith, who made a name for himself with his subtly suggestive portraits of women. Ward’s pretty portrait depicts the tragic heroine “Lucy of Leinster” from Thomas Tickell’s ballad “Lucy and Colin.” In Tickell’s sad work, Colin abandoned Lucy for a wealthier bride. Lucy died on her lover’s wedding day and, pursuant to her request, was brought to the church. Upon seeing his true love’s body, Colin succumbed to death as well, and the lovers were buried in the same tomb.”

Filed under history engraving portrait 1788 1780s white hat ribbon 18th century

66 notes

A Party Angling and the Angler’s Repast, engravings after George Morland, 1789 via Donald Heald. 

Y’all, those are some pretty amazing hats all around.  If I didn’t have white guilt because of the presence of that poor slave, I would desperately want to recreate this whole scene.  

More about Angling from Donald Heald: 

A pair of the most famous fishing prints after George Morland, the master of English genre painting.

During the eighteenth century punt fishing became a very fashionable sport, gentlemen and ladies gathered in droves to enjoy this popular outdoor pursuit. Morland was so struck with the charm of this pastime that he quickly rendered it on to canvas, thus creating two of his most cherished paintings. The two fashionable ladies pictured in the paintings are in fact Morland and Ward’s wives, while the gentlemen are John Raphael Smith and the engraver himself.”

(Source: donaldheald.com)

Filed under engraving 1789 1780s man hat tophat sporting sports fishing angling history

11 notes

Turban, 1820-1835, Victoria and Albert Museum
I love the combination of textures and colors in this turban!  Velvet is one of those fabrics that I generally dislike because it is almost overwhelmingly rich (like a piece of cake with too much icing), but I love seeing little hints of it paired with a nice crisp silk.  The contrast is lovely. 

Turban, 1820-1835, Victoria and Albert Museum

I love the combination of textures and colors in this turban!  Velvet is one of those fabrics that I generally dislike because it is almost overwhelmingly rich (like a piece of cake with too much icing), but I love seeing little hints of it paired with a nice crisp silk.  The contrast is lovely. 

Filed under history extant turban 1820s 1830s 19th century tartan plaid silk velvet green

208 notes

historyofeurope:

In 1884 Queen Victoria traveled to Coburg, Germany for a relative’s wedding.
Here she is during that trip pictured among members of her large family including such prominent figures as the future Edward VII, the future King George V, the Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, the German dowager Empress Friedrich, the future Tsar Nicholas and Alexandra of Russia, and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany.

historyofeurope:

In 1884 Queen Victoria traveled to Coburg, Germany for a relative’s wedding.

Here she is during that trip pictured among members of her large family including such prominent figures as the future Edward VII, the future King George V, the Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, the German dowager Empress Friedrich, the future Tsar Nicholas and Alexandra of Russia, and Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany.

Filed under photograph 1884 1880s 19th century victorian queen victoria royal royalty