Hats From History

Hats from History

Posts tagged straw

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The Fortune Teller, after Matthew William Peters, 1786.  Via Donald Heald.
Wow.  This is one of the best 18th Century images I have ever seen.  There is so much incredible detail!
On the fortune teller:  No cap, hair covered by only a cloth.  An elaborately trimmed but well-worn black silk-covered hat.  Her cloak hood falling open so we can see the inside, especially the neckline, and that it is trimmed ‘round the face. The hem of her cloak is left raw and is unravelling and there might be a tear. 
The fortune tellee (not a word…): A magnificent hat with some pretty glorious feathers- love that they are grey!  The curls around her face actually look a bit like bangs which are very rare.  A profusion of lace and ribbon around her neckline.  A long sleeved gown or jacket (stripes!) ending in a simple white flounce. 
I’m officially in love!

The Fortune Teller, after Matthew William Peters, 1786.  Via Donald Heald.

Wow.  This is one of the best 18th Century images I have ever seen.  There is so much incredible detail!

On the fortune teller:  No cap, hair covered by only a cloth.  An elaborately trimmed but well-worn black silk-covered hat.  Her cloak hood falling open so we can see the inside, especially the neckline, and that it is trimmed ‘round the face. The hem of her cloak is left raw and is unravelling and there might be a tear. 

The fortune tellee (not a word…): A magnificent hat with some pretty glorious feathers- love that they are grey!  The curls around her face actually look a bit like bangs which are very rare.  A profusion of lace and ribbon around her neckline.  A long sleeved gown or jacket (stripes!) ending in a simple white flounce. 

I’m officially in love!

Filed under history engraving 1786 1780s 18th century 1700s hat straw black silk cloak hood

171 notes

art-history:

Richard Caton Woodville War News from Mexico  1848 Oil on canvas  27 x 24 in Manoogian Collection, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Exhibited at the American Art-Union in 1849 and distributed nationwide in an 1851 engraving, War News from Mexico attracted notice because of its lively depiction of the home front at a time of national crisis. It portrays a sampling of the electorate gobbling up the latest news from a daily paper, which dominates the composition and serves as its focal point. 
Radiating outward from the newspaper are eleven figures and the bottom half of an eagle, all gathered under or beside the portico of a combined tavern, inn, and post office identified, with heavy-handed significance, as the “American Hotel” (hence the eagle). With wide eyes, gaping mouth, and exaggerated body language, the man at center stage reads aloud from the newspaper clutched in his fists. It reports on the latest happenings in the Mexican War (1846-8), which cost the lives of thousands of soldiers on both sides and resulted in the addition to the United States of 500,000 square miles of conquered territory in the West. The supporting players mug and gesticulate their reactions: one figure, in the shadowy background, throws up his hand; another grasps the frame of his eyeglasses; a third raps his knuckles against one of the portico’s pilasters; a fourth, who relays the news to an old gentleman with hearing difficulties, points a thumb emphatically toward the newspaper. 
Despite the obviousness of these gestures, it’s not altogether evident whether the news is good or bad for the denizens of the American Hotel. Clearly, though, they’re all personally involved in what they are hearing, and that includes the humble black man and his little girl in rags; the outcome of the war had a direct bearing on how far west Congress would permit slavery to extend. Those opposed to slavery also opposed the war. The black family is situated at the periphery: they are not part of the consensus, and although they have a personal stake in the war, they have no democratic say in it. A white woman, squeezed to the side of the canvas and visible in the window, is similarly characterized as marginal to the sphere of public discourse, which Woodville shows to be populated exclusively by adult white men. Yet she, unlike the two African Americans, occupies a place securely within, rather than outside, the national hotel.
In Woodville’s day, the elderly gentleman in old-fashioned knee breeches would have been understood as a member of the Revolutionary-era generation. His presence in the scene lends legitimacy to the current military conflict, suggesting that the war that started in 1846 embodied the ideals behind the war declared in 1776. But to the extent that the old man wears a grim or confused expression, the painting implies that ’46 is not indisputably the moral successor to ’76, and that the values of the present do not necessarily accord with those of the past. 
—Angela L. Miller, et al., American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity (2008)


What a fine collection of hats! 

art-history:

Richard Caton Woodville 
War News from Mexico  1848 
Oil on canvas  27 x 24 in
Manoogian Collection, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Exhibited at the American Art-Union in 1849 and distributed nationwide in an 1851 engraving, War News from Mexico attracted notice because of its lively depiction of the home front at a time of national crisis. It portrays a sampling of the electorate gobbling up the latest news from a daily paper, which dominates the composition and serves as its focal point. 

Radiating outward from the newspaper are eleven figures and the bottom half of an eagle, all gathered under or beside the portico of a combined tavern, inn, and post office identified, with heavy-handed significance, as the “American Hotel” (hence the eagle). With wide eyes, gaping mouth, and exaggerated body language, the man at center stage reads aloud from the newspaper clutched in his fists. It reports on the latest happenings in the Mexican War (1846-8), which cost the lives of thousands of soldiers on both sides and resulted in the addition to the United States of 500,000 square miles of conquered territory in the West. The supporting players mug and gesticulate their reactions: one figure, in the shadowy background, throws up his hand; another grasps the frame of his eyeglasses; a third raps his knuckles against one of the portico’s pilasters; a fourth, who relays the news to an old gentleman with hearing difficulties, points a thumb emphatically toward the newspaper. 

Despite the obviousness of these gestures, it’s not altogether evident whether the news is good or bad for the denizens of the American Hotel. Clearly, though, they’re all personally involved in what they are hearing, and that includes the humble black man and his little girl in rags; the outcome of the war had a direct bearing on how far west Congress would permit slavery to extend. Those opposed to slavery also opposed the war. The black family is situated at the periphery: they are not part of the consensus, and although they have a personal stake in the war, they have no democratic say in it. A white woman, squeezed to the side of the canvas and visible in the window, is similarly characterized as marginal to the sphere of public discourse, which Woodville shows to be populated exclusively by adult white men. Yet she, unlike the two African Americans, occupies a place securely within, rather than outside, the national hotel.

In Woodville’s day, the elderly gentleman in old-fashioned knee breeches would have been understood as a member of the Revolutionary-era generation. His presence in the scene lends legitimacy to the current military conflict, suggesting that the war that started in 1846 embodied the ideals behind the war declared in 1776. But to the extent that the old man wears a grim or confused expression, the painting implies that ’46 is not indisputably the moral successor to ’76, and that the values of the present do not necessarily accord with those of the past. 

—Angela L. Miller, et al., American Encounters: Art, History, and Cultural Identity (2008)

What a fine collection of hats! 

Filed under painting 1848 1840s 19th century victorian man hat straw

59 notes

historicalfashion:

Apparently, you can’t re-blog yourself…  Anyways.  Bangs!  In the 18th century!  I was amazed.  And the fact that they’re on a red head… :D!  I’m guessing at 1770s-1780s.  I’m giving it a 20 year time span to be on the safe side.  Taken from: http://stapletonkearns.blogspot.com/2009_05_01_archive.html

Well I’ll be…bangs!  One of those things that we always say “NEVER” about.  Hm. 

historicalfashion:

Apparently, you can’t re-blog yourself…  Anyways.  Bangs!  In the 18th century!  I was amazed.  And the fact that they’re on a red head… :D!  I’m guessing at 1770s-1780s.  I’m giving it a 20 year time span to be on the safe side.  Taken from: http://stapletonkearns.blogspot.com/2009_05_01_archive.html

Well I’ll be…bangs!  One of those things that we always say “NEVER” about.  Hm. 

Filed under portrait painting hat silk straw 18th century 1780s